Make a Plan

This fall, sit down with your family and develop a plan. You’ll feel much better when an emergency or disaster occurs if you can have contact with your family. Figure out how to communicate in a disaster. Where will you meet up? What if you can’t be the one to pick up your young children? Plan now, it will bring you peace of mind.

For a plan template you can either download or fill in online click the link!

http://www.ready.gov/emergency-planning-checklists

Halloween Safety Tips for All

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With Halloween Trick or Treats coming up click this link for some safety tips from the Center for Disease Control.

Have a spooky, safe time!

Need to Buy a Generator?

Here is a link with information on information you need to know to buy a generator.

A generator can keep you and your home warm, your family entertained, run your pumps, keep you cool. You need to know what size generator it takes to do what you want though. The link above is an informative document that I used when purchasing one for our home and livestock barn.

Some Information on Carbon Monoxide and Detectors

Carbon Monoxide is an odorless gas that kills. http://www.cdc.gov/co/faqs.htm

From Wikipedia information on Carbon Monoxide detectors.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide_detector

I hope the snow doesn’t fly for awhile, but you never know. So be prepared to handle it!

 

Road Conditions and Your Winter Travel Kit

If you have to travel here are links to the road reports for ND and the surrounding areas

North Dakota

Minnesota

Manitoba

South Dakota

Survival kit for winter driving:

  • BLANKETS!!! I can’t stress this enough, warmth is so very important!!!

You can build a little cooker/heater, just research it on google or your web browser!
■ 3 pieces of bright cloth 2″ wide x 36″ long (tie to antenna or door handle)
■ Several packets of soup, hot chocolate, tea, bouillon cubes, etc. (mixed into melted
snow to provide warmth and nutrition)
■ Plastic spoons
■ Packages of easy to eat, high energy foods like peanuts and candy or canned, ready-to eat
soups or fruit
■ 1 pair of socks and 1 pair of gloves or glove liners; cotton is not recommended because
it provides no insulation when wet).
■ Extra clothing and a blanket or sleeping bag Or a few of the above mentioned blankets!

■ 1 flash light and batteries (keep separate)
■ First aid kit
■ Toilet paper and sealable container for bathroom purposes
■ Fire extinguisher
■ Small tool kit
■ Ice scraper/snow brush
■ Shovel
■ Sand or other traction aid
■ Tow rope or chain
■ Jumper cables
■ Road flares or warning lights
■ Gas line antifreeze
■ Large plastic garbage bag
■ Pencil stub and paper
■ Plastic whistle
■ Cellular phone with a charger
You may want to keep the survival kit in the passenger compartment in case you go into a
ditch and can’t get to or open the trunk.
Place all items in a plastic storage container and place it in your vehicle. In North Dakota it’s a
good idea to put it in there in October!

 

Shelter in Place from Ready.gov

When evacuation to shelters is either inappropriate or impossible, you may be asked to stay where you are. This could be something as simple as just staying in your home or place of employment, while officials clear a hazard, or it could require more active steps, taken during emergencies involving contaminated air.

Identify a room with the fewest doors and windows to shelter in place. Try to provide at least 10 square feet per person.

When officials ask you to shelter in place, act quickly and follow the instructions. Your highest priority is to get to a safe indoor location. You most likely will be in your “safe room” for no more than a few hours. Once inside:Whether you are at home, work or elsewhere, there may be situations when it’s simply best to stay where you are and avoid any uncertainty outside.
There may be circumstances when staying put and creating a barrier between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside, a process known as “sealing the room,” is a matter of survival.
Use common sense and available information to assess the situation and determine if there is immediate danger. If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated, you may want to take this kind of action.
The process used to seal the room is considered a temporary protective measure to create a barrier between you and potentially contaminated air outside. It is a type of sheltering in place that requires preplanning.
• Bring your family and pets inside.
• Lock doors, close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers.
• Turn off fans, air conditioning and forced air heating systems.
• Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
• Go into an interior room with few windows, if possible.
• Seal all windows, doors and air vents with 2-4 mil. thick plastic sheeting and duct tape. Consider measuring and cutting the sheeting in advance to save time.
• Cut the plastic sheeting several inches wider than the openings and label each sheet.
• Duct tape plastic at corners first and then tape down all edges.
• Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to seal gaps so that you create a barrier between yourself and any contamination.
• Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.