Controlled Burn Procedures

 

Cavalier County has issued the following procedures for landowners, contractors, equipment operators, and outdoor enthusiasts when engaged in open area controlled burning situations.  


 The following procedures are to ensure that open burning is coordinated with the proper authorities for maximum safety to both people and property.

  1. Contact the Cavalier County Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) at 256-2555 before a controlled open burn is started so that emergency responders are not dispatched for reports of fire, when in fact it is a controlled burn.  Be prepared to give your name, contact number, location of the controlled burn and anticipated duration of the burn.  After the burning is completed and the fire is out, contact the PSAP again at 256-2555 to inform them of the completion. PLEASE DO NOT burn when the fire danger index is VERY HIGH, EXTREME OR WHEN THERE IS A RED FLAG WARNING. Contact your fire district chief when doing a controlled burn also, the list of chiefs is available here.


  2. Controlled burns need to be physically manned and monitored at all times.  Once the fire has been started, do not leave the site unattended until the fire is completely out.


  3. Be prepared if the fire gets out of hand!  Call 9-1-1 immediately and have resources available to mitigate the effects (e.g. tractor, digger, shovels, etc.).

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  4. A recreational fire can be an enjoyable outdoor activity when conducted safely. When burning a recreational fire on your property, remember to be a good neighbor. You are responsible for keeping your family, your friends, neighbors and children safe. The intent of these guidelines is to prevent fire hazards and ensure that your recreational fire is safe and enjoyable.

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  5. What is the correct size and location for my recreational fire?
    Recreational fires shall be limited in size to 3-feet-wide by 3-feet-high and must be at least 25 feet from any combustible structures such as homes, sheds, decks or fences.
    Exception: Portable, screened fire vessels may be used within 25 feet of combustible structures provided they are positioned at a safe distance from said structures, located on anon-combustible surface (i.e.patio, driveway or bare ground), and the fire conforms to the 3×3-feet size limitation.
    The fire must be located on your own property. A responsible adult must be present at all times.

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  6. What can I burn in my recreational fire?
    Only wood, minimum 1-inch in diameter may be burned. Prohibited items include: brush, yard waste, treated or
    painted lumber, trash or rubbish.
    A means of controlling or extinguishing the fire must be available at all times, such as a garden hose or shovel, and
    loose dirt.
    The fire must be completely extinguished when unattended.

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You are urged to check the North Dakota Fire Danger Rating prior to any controlled burn.  This information and current fire danger ratings are available on the following Web site:

Fire Danger Map

 

Preventing and Thawing Frozen Pipes from ND Rural Water

1. Determine the location of the frozen pipe. This can be done by touching or by running your hand along
accessible water pipes in the home while feeling for extremely cold spots. If a cold portion of pipe is
encountered; thaw it gently, preferably using a hair dryer. DO NOT use a propane torch, as it could
cause a rupture of the water line.
2. If you suspect the water line is about to freeze, check the temperature of the water. Do this at the
location of where the water enters the home. If the temperature is close to freezing, run a substantial
amount of water until the temperature increases. This could take some time. Showering and washing
extra loads of laundry will put the extra water to good use.
3. If you choose to leave the water in the home trickling, be careful! Leaving the water running at a
trickle can help prevent frozen water service lines. However, trickling water can sometimes lead to
frozen sewer service lines. In the past, water and sewer lines were installed in close proximity of each
other and often at the same depth. Trickling water in a sewer line can cool to the point of freezing if
the sewer line is cold. This could lead to the sewer service freezing shut and causing a sewer backup.
4. If you chose to run the water at a trickle, it is advised to periodically turn the flow of water up to about
a garden hose size stream for several minutes. The increased flow of water allows for a better
exchange of heat between the water and water service line/ground and also allows the water to assist
in heating the sewer system.
5. If the consumer having a freezing water issue is on a septic system, trickling water should be diverted
away from the septic system. Septic systems have a limited capability to accept excess water in deep
frost conditions. The trickling water could compromise the on-site septic system, leaving the customer
with more problems and expense. If possible, use a hose to run the trickling water to an outside,
acceptable area.
6. Electrically heating of water lines, using a welder, only works on metallic lines. It will not work if there
is any plastic or pvc piping in the service line. Care should be taken, if using a welder, as they have
been known to start fires in adjacent structures. It has also been found that the use of welders can
increase the speed at which cast iron or ductile iron lines corrode.
7. If the water service line does become frozen advise the customer to open one or two faucets. This will
allow the ice to have room to expand without damaging any other piping.
8. There are companies throughout the state that have the ability to thaw frozen services with a recirculating
thawing unit. If there is no one that offers this service in your area and you would like
assistance, please contact us at 1-800-349-6951. We will guide you through the processes of
constructing a thawing unit and its operation.

Winter Weather Home and Away

An emergency supply kit should include a three-day supply of food and water, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio and extra flashlights and batteries. Thoroughly check and update your family’s emergency supply kit and add the following supplies in preparation for winter weather:

  • Rock salt to melt ice on walkways;
  • Sand to improve traction;
  • Snow shovels and other snow removal equipment;
  • And adequate clothing and blankets to help keep you warm.
  • Ensure your family preparedness plan and contacts are up to date and exercise your plan. Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government, and ensure your home and car are prepared for the winter weather.

Finally, everyone should get familiar with the terms that are used to identify a winter storm hazard and discuss with your family what to do if a winter storm watch or warning is issued. Terms used to describe a winter storm hazard include the following:

  • Freezing Rain creates a coating of ice on roads and walkways.
  • Sleet is rain that turns to ice pellets before reaching the ground. Sleet also causes roads to freeze and become slippery.
  • Winter Weather Advisory means cold, ice and snow are expected.
  • Winter Storm Watch means severe weather such as heavy snow or ice is possible in the next day or two.
  • Winter Storm Warning means severe winter conditions have begun or will begin very soon.

Shelter in Place from Ready.gov

When evacuation to shelters is either inappropriate or impossible, you may be asked to stay where you are. This could be something as simple as just staying in your home or place of employment, while officials clear a hazard, or it could require more active steps, taken during emergencies involving contaminated air.

Identify a room with the fewest doors and windows to shelter in place. Try to provide at least 10 square feet per person.

When officials ask you to shelter in place, act quickly and follow the instructions. Your highest priority is to get to a safe indoor location. You most likely will be in your “safe room” for no more than a few hours. Once inside:Whether you are at home, work or elsewhere, there may be situations when it’s simply best to stay where you are and avoid any uncertainty outside.
There may be circumstances when staying put and creating a barrier between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside, a process known as “sealing the room,” is a matter of survival.
Use common sense and available information to assess the situation and determine if there is immediate danger. If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated, you may want to take this kind of action.
The process used to seal the room is considered a temporary protective measure to create a barrier between you and potentially contaminated air outside. It is a type of sheltering in place that requires preplanning.
• Bring your family and pets inside.
• Lock doors, close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers.
• Turn off fans, air conditioning and forced air heating systems.
• Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
• Go into an interior room with few windows, if possible.
• Seal all windows, doors and air vents with 2-4 mil. thick plastic sheeting and duct tape. Consider measuring and cutting the sheeting in advance to save time.
• Cut the plastic sheeting several inches wider than the openings and label each sheet.
• Duct tape plastic at corners first and then tape down all edges.
• Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to seal gaps so that you create a barrier between yourself and any contamination.
• Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.